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Marijuana - Impaired Driving

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SAFETY AND INTERVENTION TIPS
Prevention is the most effective measure to reduce injury, death and other consequences of drugged driving. If someone you know attempts to drive while drugged, follow these tips to intervene.   

  1. MAKE IT CLEAR THAT YOU CARE.
    Explain how you don’t want them to hurt themselves or others. 
  2. AVOID CONFRONTATION. 
    Try not to argue or fight when discussing plans for transportation. 
  3. BAND TOGETHER. 
    If your friend won’t listen to your concerns, enlist help from others. It’s harder to say “no” to a group of people than one person. 
  4. FIND A SAFE RIDE.
    Encourage them to hand over their keys and arrange to get them home safely. They’ll thank you later. 
  5. NEVER DRIVE OR RIDE WITH A DRUG-IMPAIRED DRIVER. 
    If intervention isn't possible, call the police, so you know you've done all you can to keep someone from being hurt.

References:
1.
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

DUIS ARE NOT JUST FOR THOSE WHO DRINK AND DRIVE. 
The number of drug-impaired drivers on the road is on the rise. According to a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration survey, nearly 1 in 4 weekend drivers tested positive for at least one drug that could affect driving skills.

Drugged driving occurs when someone is under the influence of marijuana, prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, or illegal drugs, like methamphetamine.

Drivers can also be impaired by both alcohol and a drug, increasing their risk even further.

DRUGGED DRIVING IS LIKE DRUNK DRIVING 

  1. Slow Reaction Time 
  2. Difficulty Maintaining Attention
  3. Reduced Peripheral/ Side Vision
  4. Hard to Stay in Traffic Lane
  5. Harder to Judge Distance
  6. Slower Decision-Making
  7. Reduced Coordination

IF YOU FEEL DIFFERENT, YOU DRIVE DIFFERENT

That's the message of a new ad campaign from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

Some 44 percent of drivers killed in crashes in 2016 across the US who were tested afterward had drugs in their system, according to a recent Governors Highway Safety Association study. That's an increase of 28 percent from a decade ago.



TIMELINE OF MARIJUANA’S EFFECTS

10-30 Minutes — Approximate time after the last puff until peak effects occur*.





+ 2-5 Hours  How long a driver is impaired after taking marijuana.**





2+ Weeks — Length of time THC can be detected after last use.

*Edibles and other methods of marijuana use present different timelines. Do not use these products and drive.
**Some people may experience impairment more than five hours after using marijuana.

DON’T FORGET  
Prescriptions and other physician-recommended or over-the-counter drugs can also affect your driving abilities in similar ways. Like drunk driving, drugged driving is impaired driving. It’s illegal, and it puts drivers, their passengers and others on the road at risk. If you are driving under the influence of any drug — legal or illegal — you can be arrested for DUI.

Combining alcohol with ANY other drug, including marijuana or prescription medication, can lead to a higher level of impairment and longer-lasting effects.